AMD Ryzen PC Hardware Processors

REVIEW | Ryzen 3 3100 and 3300X: It works without beating up your budget.

AMD’s latest budget quad-core processors are coming in at an affordable price with an attractive price to performance ratio thanks to the 7nm tech and SMT.

The Ryzen 3 3100 is a 65-watt TDP processor that features four cores and eight threads, 18MB of cache, and can boost up to 3.6-3.9GHz.

On the other hand, The Ryzen 3 3300X is a similar processor but with a bit higher CPU clock speed ranging around 3.8-4.3GHz, and a higher retail price as well.

Ryzen 3 3100 vs 3300X

Though they are similar in core count and cache size, the differences end there. The Ryzen 3 3300X has a different topology wherein it uses a single active CCX module, meaning that all four cores are in the same CCX. This is beneficial to reduce core-to-core latency, and all the cache is made available in that one CCX module translating into better multi core performance.

Both open up customers in entering the latest generation of processors without losing much of their budget. A clearly enticing deal from anyone building their first pc or someone from past generation processors. Having an option to jump in to the latest generation hardware is important for anyone and sometimes the very reason why people upgrade.

Testing Rig

Ideally, we would have tested these processors with a motherboard using the new B550 chipset to give that budget build vibe. For now, we’ll be using our MSI X570 Gaming Edge Wifi with 16GB of DDR4-3400Mhz CL16 Memory and an MSI RTX 2060 Gaming Z. This is to give you an idea of what kind of performance to expect in this kind of system in case you want to build a gaming PC of similar specs.

We often times treat these reviews as comparing different processor but lose the essence of “reviewing” the item as it is – So we have treated this more as a review and just providing insight on the level of performance seen in every benchmark.

Benchmarks

Starting off with the usual Cinebench R20 benchmark – We see both straddling the lines of usability of that from an Intel I5 9400 and ultimately the aging Intel 6700k and 7700k. This goes for both the single and multi thread tests. This also paints a picture of how far these 2 processors are. Absolutely game changing.

On the Ashes of The Singularity CPU focused benchmark our system as able to. Something along the lines of early generation Ryzen 5s – this is still promising considering the amount of power in fewer cores and a lower tdp.

For CSGO, a CPU intensive esport title we are seeing framerates still exceed the high numbers seen in lan tournaments which makes this a viable option for these kind of clients. An option and decision brings the market together from big clients to smaller more consumer based niches.

Finally at Rainbow Six: Siege a slightly more graphically intensive esport title that benefits with multi-core CPU’s – The thing with esports titles these days are they slowly grow their appetite for resources and with existing titles adding more content and upgrading their graphics it pays to have attention on how hardware behaves with these changes.

Rainbow Six as one of the esports titles that originally is a moderately resource hungry title have made changes multiple times in its system but according to our benchmarks both the Ryzen 3300x and 3100 can still tank the game to run at high framerates needed for competitive play.

Final thoughts and recommendations

AMD has made amazing business decisions – some are even last minute ones but I believe that the 3100 and 3300x fills a similar niche as the 3500x. The niche that places a buyer wanting to buy latest generation hardware but holding a budget enough to get some past hardware with lower prices.

The 3100 and 3300x performs well and this is an understatement when we add the price and TDP of this processor. Apart from individuals with more shallow pockets – the lower tdp also has people creating smaller form factor builds with limited power and cooler clearance. The low tdp but good performance brings this on the tippy top of the A-list without sacrificing frames for mobility.

It just works and it’ll continue to do so just because the combination of price and decent performance is a huge factor checked at the same time for would be buyers.

Pros:

A checkmark for the most part – price, performance, and low TDP creates a product eyed by many and chosen by most when faced with limitations for pc building.

an option to ditch old hardware – the problem most people have is ditching old hardware as they really can’t resell these old pieces to buy something that can perform slightly better or something more updated. The spearheads of the 3100 and 3300x makes it easier for this crowd to upgrade.

Cons:

specific niche – as great items in the market goes, this is built for specific niches. This isn’t something bad when you consider you are for a huge and broad selection of groups wanting to buy this product.

We recommend this to anyone. PERIOD
Whether you may be building your first pc, upgrading, or just want to make a secondary pc – this should be part of your options. I can even extend to general office use as the price will make any purchasing department of any company happy.

Seth Francisco Capili
Seth is a marketing and business professional by choice - a tech enthusiast and writer by birth. Back from the brink of almost disconnecting with his technological side; Seth reunites with his technological persona through writing and managing a business around computers. With a knack for interacting with people and machine - Seth spearheads the social media management and content writing efforts of GGWPTECH. "In search of darkness, Never bring light - In search of Sethan, Google @ItzYaBoiSethan"

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